AMD this afternoon has sent out a brief update to the public and investors, offering an update on the status of the ongoing Xilinx acquisition. AMD’s purchase of the FPGA maker, which was previous expected to close by the end of this year, is now expected to close in the first quarter of 2022. Attributing the setback to delays in regulatory approval, AMD believes they’ll be able to finally secure the necessary approval for the $35 billion deal next quarter.

As a quick refresher, AMD first announced their intention to buy Xilinx back in October of 2020. The FPGA maker was a lucrative target for AMD, whose sales (and market capitalization) have been growing by leaps and bounds over the last few years. This has brought AMD to the point where they are looking at diversification, as well as covering any gaps in their product lineup that would be holding them back in the server market. As the plan goes, acquiring Xilinx, will allow AMD to offer FPGAs alongside (and potentially integrated with) their current CPU and GPU/accelerator products.

The deal was previously expected to close by the end of 2021, and AMD has remained very tight lipped on the matter outside of their initial announcement. None the less, acquiring the necessary regulatory approval is apparently taking AMD longer than planned. According to the company they are not expecting to need to change the deal or alter any of its terms, but they will need another quarter to get the last approvals required to close the deal.

“We continue making good progress on the required regulatory approvals to close our transaction. While we had previously expected that we would secure all approvals by the end of 2021, we have not yet completed the process and we now expect the transaction to close in the first quarter of 2022. Our conversations with regulators continue to progress productively, and we expect to secure all required approvals.”

There are no additional changes to the previously announced terms or plans regarding the transaction and the companies continue to look forward to the proposed combination creating the industry’s high-performance and adaptive computing leader.

Source: AMD IR

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  • lemurbutton - Saturday, January 1, 2022 - link

    "CCP screws with the West"

    This is a joke right? The CCP isn't the one going around telling each country how to conduct its own business. The West, especially the US, has been installing and removing leaders and destablizing countries since after the first world war.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Monday, January 3, 2022 - link

    Nice whataboutism.

    The article didn't say it, but if @r3loaded happens to *know* that China is the long-pole in getting this done, then it's not unreasonable to question their motives.
    Reply
  • lemurbutton - Monday, January 3, 2022 - link

    And what about "The West" motives with China? The West are the good guys right? Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, January 4, 2022 - link

    The West is not the ones ethnically cleansing millions of indigenous people from Xing Jiang province. Reply
  • Spunjji - Wednesday, January 5, 2022 - link

    Nope, we outsource most of our ethnic cleansing these days. We're also, y'know, sponsoring the state doing the ethnic cleansing in China.

    No clean hands here.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, January 6, 2022 - link

    > we outsource most of our ethnic cleansing these days.

    That implies it was somehow a foregone conclusion that this would follow from globalization. It certainly isn't. China doesn't need to do this.

    > No clean hands here.

    If the US and other Western countries did nothing about it, then that would be a fair critique.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-59595952

    In tech news, Intel recently issued public apologies to China for cutting off suppliers who sourced from Xinjiang, blaming the US government for forcing its hand.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-59769393

    Yes, the US Congress recently passed a law requiring companies to prove that goods imported from China's Xinjiang region have not been produced with forced labor.

    I'm truly disappointed in you, Spunjji. You're usually one of the most sane, reasonable, and informed posters on here. I guess you don't follow international news, much.
    Reply
  • Samus - Monday, January 3, 2022 - link

    The CCP learned from the best. Reply
  • Xajel - Monday, January 3, 2022 - link

    And the US is playing silly buggers and forcing TSMC to not produce chips for Chinese companies.

    Don't play the "National Security" card, every country has the right to protect their national security including China.

    I really hope this deal will be approved as quick as possible, unlike the NV/ARM deal.
    Reply
  • Silver5urfer - Friday, December 31, 2021 - link

    I look forward for the integration of FPGA onto the Zen x86 design and crush all ARM specialized BS blocks and other junk. This will be monumental for sure. Imagine having a block which allows end user to run the custom workload, it will be a huge technological change. Reply
  • lemurbutton - Sunday, January 2, 2022 - link

    Lol. Zen CPU is so far behind Apple, it’s a joke. It’s even behind Intel at this point. Reply

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