Hot Test Results

Great Wall’s platform overall delivers a good power quality. As a matter of fact, the platform’s overall performance seems to have improved significantly since the last time we reviewed a similar unit, indicating that the OEM is candidly trying to improve.

Riotoro Onyx 650W - Main Output
Load (Watts) 132.07 W 329.14 W 490.17 W 652.48 W
Load (Percent) 20.32% 50.64% 75.41% 100.38%
  Amperes Volts Amperes Volts Amperes Volts Amperes Volts
3.3 V 2.16 3.39 5.4 3.38 8.11 3.37 10.81 3.35
5 V 2.16 5.13 5.4 5.12 8.11 5.08 10.81 5.05
12 V 9.34 12.17 23.35 12.13 35.02 12.04 46.69 12.03
Line Regulation
(20% to 100% load)
Voltage Ripple (mV)
20% Load 50% Load 75% Load 100% Load CL1
12V
CL2
3.3V + 5V
3.3V 1.4% 8 12 16 24 10 22
5V 1.5% 8 16 20 30 16 26
12V 1.2% 16 30 44 52 68 26

We can see that the voltage regulation is significantly improved and very good for PSUs of this class and power range, at 1.2% on the 12V line and lower than 1.5% on the minor lines. The power quality readings are not going to break any performance records, but a maximum voltage ripple of 52 mV and 54 mV on the 12V line of the 650W and 750W models respectively is good, less than half that of the recommended design limit. Both units appear to be a little stressed when heavily cross loaded, with abnormally high ripple appearing on the 12V line, but the reading still do not go anywhere near the 120 mV design limit.

Riotoro Onyx 750W - Main Output
Load (Watts) 152.2 W 378.21 W 565.85 W 751.8 W
Load (Percent) 20.29% 50.43% 75.45% 100.24%
  Amperes Volts Amperes Volts Amperes Volts Amperes Volts
3.3 V 2.2 3.38 5.49 3.36 8.24 3.36 10.98 3.34
5 V 2.2 5.16 5.49 5.13 8.24 5.09 10.98 5.08
12 V 10.98 12.15 27.45 12.08 41.18 12.05 54.9 12.01
Line Regulation
(20% to 100% load)
Voltage Ripple (mV)
20% Load 50% Load 75% Load 100% Load CL1
12V
CL2
3.3V + 5V
3.3V 1.4% 10 12 14 20 10 20
5V 1.5% 8 16 22 30 16 22
12V 1.2% 16 30 46 54 70 24

High ambient temperatures have a significant (but not abnormal) impact on the energy conversion efficiency of the Onyx 650W and Onyx 750W PSUs. The average nominal load range (20%-100%) efficiency drops by 0.7% for both units, with the drop almost evenly distributed across the load range, hinting that there are no component quality or stress issues. The nominal load range (20%-100%) efficiency is now 87.3% and, theoretically, both units sustain their 80Plus Bronze efficiency rating even under these operating conditions (the efficiency certifications are being performed with an ambient temperature of 25°C).

A quick glance on the sound pressure level charts shows that the noise levels of the Onyx units are unusually low for units with just an 80Plus Bronze rating. Both units are certainly going to be audible with a load greater than just 200 Watts under these operating conditions, but the noise levels of the fans only slightly surpass 46 dB(A) under maximum load, a relatively low reading taking into account the unit’s power output, efficiency and heatsinks. The reason for this is that the used fan is most likely slightly undersized for the cooling needs of these units, as the internal temperatures do reach uncomfortably high readings when the Onyx PSUs are heavily loaded under these working conditions. 

Cold Test Results: ~25ºC Final Words & Conclusion
POST A COMMENT

32 Comments

View All Comments

  • fanofanand - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    Once upon a time I made the mistake of buying a high-end PSU from a relatively new outfit that was created by former execs and engineers from a high-profile component manufacturer. Everything seemed brilliant. Excellent power characteristics with nary a ripple, fully modular design, it seemed fantastic. Two years later it crapped out on me taking a few components with it (yes it was hooked up to surge protectors and a UPS). When I went to go back to the manufacturer whatdya know, they were already gone. I was left in the lurch with several fried components and no recourse for my warranty. Never again, I will stick with the known quantities on PSUs. It is a far more important component than many give it credit for. Reply
  • feelingshorter - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    Had a Corsair PSU years back, started making a buzzing sound closer to the end of it's warranty. Corsair replaced it but the new PSU still made that buzzing sound. Bought a SeaSonic X650 back when it first came out for for $115-$120 (expensive b/c it was the first 80 plus gold at the time) and it has been rock solid without any electronic buzzing. I agree with your statement, I can't trust a new company either. Had a Nvidia graphics card fail and the company, BFG Tech disappeared. They offered a "life time warranty" and the card was barely past 2 years. No thanks. BFG Tech also sold PSUs and I was wondering if we are talking about the same company. Reply
  • fanofanand - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    Nope, the company was Tagan, and I bought it based off this review (Gee thanks Anandtech.....)

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/2357

    I had the 700 watt version as I was one of the suckers who thought my 8800 and Q6600 "needed" 700 watts. I figured if their top end version was among the best of the best, surely their 700 watt would be just as solid. Apparently not.
    Reply
  • BrokenCrayons - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    Anandtech and any other hardware reviewer can't really test long term reliability. They sample a single unit (potentially cherry picked by the vendor if the reviewer doesn't buy retail parts) which is never a statistically significant number and test it over the course of a short period of time. There's nothing AT can do to test for years' long operational capabilities. Reply
  • fanofanand - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    Oh I know, I'm not actually blaming Anandtech, just taking a cheap shot. :) Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, March 23, 2017 - link

    I purchased a PC Power and Cooling Silencer 750 Quad 10 years ago based on an anandtech review. Still have it, still works, and it was on a miner 24/7 for 4 years. Reply
  • fanofanand - Friday, March 24, 2017 - link

    Cool story but how is that relevant? PC Power and Cooling wasn't an unknown entity ten years ago. Reply
  • Galid - Monday, March 27, 2017 - link

    That is a complete sophism, sorry it happened to you, the new kid on the block deceived you back then but that is a fallacious argument. I beleive MILLIONS peoples made money, great investments on what used to be new back in the days. My father used to invest in apple when it was new, some peeps went in to say ''this is a dangerous investment, we don't know nothing about them''. He also invested 1500$ on Bombardier back when it was a new company. He made 180k$ from that even if it was risky

    The new honda accord 2017 is worse/better than the honda accord 2016, this is an example of a sophism, you can't use that as an argument.

    If we base life on argumenting like that, maybe you shouldn't walk on the sideways, there are reports of people that died hit by a car or just slip on the ice.

    Maybe you should move from your home if you have carpet/wood in it, there are reoprtedly homes that caught fire.

    Maybe you should stop doing anything because there are reports about people getting in real danger doing just about anything in life including but not limited to: breathing, swimming, walking, looking at the sky, watching TV, sleeping, etc...
    Reply
  • Galid - Monday, March 27, 2017 - link

    You know, life is risky, you won't get out of it. Don't try to dodge EVERY risky moves because well, your life WILL be boring. If you really care about risks, huddle in the corner, we'll feed you, give you protection and you'll live being 120 years old. But what a life... Reply
  • Ascaris - Sunday, April 9, 2017 - link

    "You know, life is risky, you won't get out of it."
    You contradict yourself. If life is risky, how is he going to live forever as you say?
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now